Portrait of a Man (detail), about 100 B.C. Bronze, white paste and dark stone, 32.5 x 22 x 22 cm. Image courtesy of the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. (Photo: Marie Mauzy / Art Resource, NY).
Portrait of a Man (detail), about 100 B.C. Bronze, white paste and dark stone, 32.5 x 22 x 22 cm. Image courtesy of the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. (Photo: Marie Mauzy / Art Resource, NY).

Brentwood neighbors are invited for some wine, cheese, and fine art at the Getty Center to view the museum’s latest exhibit, Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculptures of the Hellenistic World, on Sunday, August 23. From 3:30 to 5:30 pm, the community can view this unprecedented international loan exhibition of about 50 significant bronzes of the Hellenistic age. After experiencing about three centuries of artwork, the community can digest the display at a wine and cheese reception from 4:30  to 6:30 pm.

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Power and Pathos is on display now until November 1.

More from the exhibit’s website:

“During the Hellenistic period from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. until the establishment of the Roman Empire in 31 B.C., the medium of bronze drove artistic innovation. Sculptors moved beyond Classical norms, supplementing traditional subjects and idealized forms with realistic renderings of physical and emotional states. Bronze—surpassing marble with its tensile strength, reflective effects, and ability to hold fine detail—was employed for dynamic compositions, dazzling displays of the nude body, and graphic expressions of age and character.

Cast from alloys of copper, tin, lead, and other elements, bronze statues were produced in the thousands: honorific portraits of rulers and citizens populated city squares, and images of gods, heroes, and mortals crowded sanctuaries. Few, however, survive. This unprecedented exhibition unites fifty significant bronzes of the Hellenistic age. New discoveries appear with works known for centuries, and several closely related statues are presented side by side for the first time.

This exhibition was organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi in Florence, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, with the participation of the Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.”

The Getty Center is located at 1200 Getty Center Drive. For more information visit getty.edu/visit/cal/events/ev_425.html.

RSVP for the Brentwood neighborhood event before August 17 by calling 310.440.7300 or emailing community relations@getty.edu.

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